Life in rural Lanzarote is quite different to the way things are in the resorts. The pace of life is slower, and things haven’t really changed much over the years. Here are a few things you can expect:

Cars Stop In The Middle Of The Road

It’s perfectly acceptable to stop in the middle of the road in a village to have a chat with a neighbour. Don’t stress, don’t toot, just relax and wait until they’ve finished!

Complete Strangers Say “Goodbye” As They Pass You In The Street

Here in Spain, we don’t say “Hello” as we pass people, we say “Goodbye” or “See you later.” And the tradition of greeting everyone, even strangers, remains strong in rural Lanzarote, so as people pass you, they will make eye contact and say “Adios” or “Hasta luego.”

Siesta Still Happens

Almost all village businesses in rural Lanzarote close during siesta, so either get to them in the morning, or plan your visit for late afternoon, when everything is opening again.

Places Close For Summer Holidays

It might seem bizarre, but many businesses, including restaurants, actually close for the summer holidays in rural Lanzarote, so all the staff take time off together. The sign will say “Cerrado por vacciones” and annoyingly, often won’t tell you when they plan to re open!

The “Old Boys” Sit On Street Corners And Watch The World Go By

In most villages, you’ll see three or four old fellas sitting on a street corner, chewing the cud. We suspect they’ve been kicked out of the house by their wives!

Everyone Has Morning Coffee

Morning coffee is a serious business in Spain, especially in rural Lanzarote – everyone has a set time to enjoy their coffee, and it’s always spent sitting in a cafetería meeting friends. Don’t be surprised when you call into a bank or the town hall to see someone, to be told they are “having coffee and will be back in half an hour.”

Nobody Hurries Anywhere

Life is slower in the villages, and you’ll rarely see anyone hurrying. Take your time and match their pace, you’ll find it relaxing!

The People Wear Clothes!

You’ll find most people wear everyday clothes in the villages, so that means trousers, shirts and shoes! You’ll almost never see locals in shorts, vests or flip flops.

Here are some drinks you’ll hear Canarians ordering.