We spent an afternoon with Wine Tours Lanzarote recently, joining 7 of their clients to experience a wine tour and tasting in the wine region. Although we’ve been to many of the bodegas, one of the attractions of their particular tour includes visits to two boutique bodegas, that most people don’t get to see.

We were met by Anita, our guide, who is originally from Madrid and who clearly has a passion for Lanzarote and our wines. Transport was via one of Wine Tours’ comfortable air conditioned mini buses.

La Bodeguita del Tablero

We started with this little Bodega, and Anita kicked things off  by taking us into the vines and explaining how the picon (black ash) came about during the eruptions and how the vines actually grow here in our desert climate. She explained about the different grape varieties grown here and how they have remained resistant to infections that blighted much if Europe’s wineries over the years.

We then went inside for our tasting. We loved the story behind this bodega – it is now run by Juan Antonio, who was an Arrecife taxi driver. The bodega was his father’s, and when he died, JA was thrust into the business at a busy harvest time. He learned quickly and now produces some excellent wines.

We tried their dry Malvasía white and a red made from the Listan Negro grape. The former was an excellent example of my favourite wine, and the latter very dry and with lots of tannin.

We were given some local goat’s cheese to try with the wines, and I loved the one that had been cured in curry powder so much I bought a whole cheese!

Bodegas Rubicón

We went on to Rubicón next. I love the building, and we had a good tour, with Anita explaining how parts of the old building had been used previously, and showing us their impressive board room, in the old aljibe.

We tasted their Amalia Seco, made once again from 100% Malvasía. It’s a few years since I’ve tried this one, and I’d forgotten how good it was. We also tried the Moscatel sweet wine. For a dessert wine, this is very pale, and has a quite delicate flavour. It’s won many awards, although I’m not a huge fan.

Vega Volcan

Our final bodega was Vega Volcan, which is run by an Arrecife based lawyer and his artist wife. The little bodega is obviously a labour of love for them, and they have the tiniest fermentation room I’ve ever seen. They also have goats, and make their own cheese, and we were served some very fresh goat’s cheese with our tasting.

We tired their white (excellent,) their red (needs more time, I think,) and a rosé, which had the brightest colour. They have nicknamed it “Christmas wine,” and it was delicious, light and fruity. I could imagine quaffing it on a summer’s day with the barbecue smoking.

Teleclub La Asomada

After trying so much wine, we were all ready to eat, and this particular tour includes tapas at the Teleclub, or sociedad, in La Asomada. They did us proud, with fish churros, ropa vieja, tuna, pork, goat stew, ensaladilla rusa, chick peas, garlic bread and Canarian potatoes.

Don’t plan an evening meal after doing one of these tours – you won’t need it!

Overall, it was a great experience – good wine, great information and a cracking meal at the end of it. Anita has an excellent knowledge of the wines and the region, and takes time to explain everything, including how to get the best from tasting wine. Highly recommended.

You can book your tour here: Wine Tours Lanzarote.